May 14, 2021

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New Zealand and China’s differences are becoming more and more difficult to reconcile and analyze

Newzealand prime minister

Ardern said that as China's global role continues to expand and change, the differences between the two countries on certain issues will become increasingly difficult to reconcile. (AFP file map)

Ardern pointed out that New Zealand and China have different views on human rights issues, including the treatment of Uighurs in Xinjiang,

 New Zealand Prime Minister Ardern said that as China’s global role continues to expand and change, the differences between the two countries on certain issues will become increasingly difficult to reconcile.

In a speech at the Auckland China Business Summit on Monday (May 3), Ardern said that China and New Zealand have “no, cannot and will not reach consensus” on certain issues, but she emphasized that the relationship between the two countries may not necessarily be reached. Defined by these differences. China is New Zealand’s largest trading partner and export market, accounting for one-third of New Zealand’s total exports.

She said: “China’s role in the global expansion and changes are well known. The differences between our systems, and the differences in the interests and values ​​that contribute to these systems, are becoming increasingly difficult to reconcile. This is us, and the Indo-Pacific The challenges that many countries in Europe and other regions are struggling to cope with.”

Ardern pointed out that New Zealand and China have different views on human rights issues, including the treatment of Uighurs in Xinjiang, China, and democracy and freedom in Hong Kong. She said that New Zealand will continue to discuss these issues individually or through partners, and that handling relations with China has always been difficult.

Analysts pointed out that Ardern’s remarks appeared to be to ease the diplomatic shock caused by her foreign minister’s recent remarks.

New Zealand’s Foreign Minister Mahuta said at a meeting of the “New Zealand-China Relations Promotion Committee” last month that he was “uncomfortable” with the “Five Eyes Intelligence and Security Alliance” expanding the scope of cooperation. She said that New Zealand has reservations about handling other military and foreign affairs through the Five Eyes Alliance. New Zealand is obviously unwilling to use the Five Eyes Alliance to criticize Beijing, which has caused concern and even dissatisfaction among other members of the alliance, the United States, Britain, Canada, and Australia.

However, international political analyst Miller believes that Ardern is certainly to ease diplomatic pressure, but does not mean that New Zealand will change its overall policy of being more friendly to China or at least more neutral.

Chinese Ambassador to New Zealand Wu Xi also participated in the above-mentioned business summit. When she spoke, she warned again that the issues related to Hong Kong and Xinjiang are China’s internal affairs. She said: “We hope that New Zealand can maintain an objective and fair position, abide by international law, and not interfere in China’s internal affairs, so as to maintain the healthy development of relations between the two countries.”

The New Zealand Parliament has decided today to consider a proposal on Xinjiang. The proposal proposed by a political party calls for defining the current situation in Xinjiang as “genocide” and calls on the Chinese government to “take action to fulfill its obligations under the United Nations Convention.” Prior to this, the British and Canadian parliaments passed similar bills.

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