May 14, 2021

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UN Human Rights Expert: “Deeply disappointed” that Japan wants to discharge nuclear wastewater into the sea

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United Nations human rights experts issued a joint statement on the 15th, "deeply disappointed" over the Japanese government's decision to dispose of nuclear waste water from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident by means of marine discharge. (AFP)

The United Nations human rights experts issued a joint statement on the 15th, “deeply disappointed” by the Japanese government’s decision to dispose of nuclear wastewater from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident by means of ocean discharge, saying that this move may affect the lives of millions of people in the Pacific. Life and livelihood.

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Toxic Substances and Human Rights Orellana, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food Fahri, and the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment Boyd said in a joint statement that the decision of the Japanese government is very impressive. Worry, because millions of tons of polluted water discharged into the sea may have a serious impact on the lives of many people and the entire environment, thus posing a great threat to the protection of human rights.

The statement said that the Japanese government claims that the nuclear wastewater can be treated with the “Multi-Nuclide Removal Equipment” (ALPS) technology to remove radioactive isotopes in the water, but the previous practice has shown that this technology cannot completely eliminate the risk of radioactive hazards in the nuclear wastewater. At the same time, the Japanese government underestimated the harmfulness of radioactive materials in nuclear wastewater, and its threat to humans and the environment may continue for more than 100 years.

The statement said that considering that the disposal of nuclear waste water from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident by ocean discharge is not the only viable option, Japan’s decision is particularly disappointing. Japan should effectively prevent the leakage of hazardous materials and fully assess the risks of its actions in order to better protect the marine environment rather than harm.

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