April 20, 2021

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Indonesia Bombing: terrorist’s attack on Church, things you need to know

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A Catholic church in Makassar, Indonesia was hit by a terrorist attack on March 28, causing two deaths and at least 20 injuries. (AFP)

Indonesia Bombing: A Catholic church in Makassar, Indonesia was hit by a terrorist attack on March 28, causing two deaths and at least 20 injuries. (AFP)

Indonesia Bombing: The terrorist attack on a Catholic church in Makassar, the capital of South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia on March 28 resulted in two deaths and at least 20 injuries, which once again aroused the international community’s attention to terrorist attacks in Asia.

The two attackers were newlyweds who had been married for only half a year

According to the Indonesian police, the assailants were newlyweds who had been married for about six months, both worked in the private sector, and the man was about 25 years old. The police did not release the names of the two men, but confirmed that they were from the Jamaah Ansharut Daulah (JAD) loyal to the Islamic State Organization (IS).

Founded in 2015, JAD is a local extremist organization in Indonesia. It has launched many terrorist attacks against police, civilians, and religious sites in Indonesia.

On the morning of the 28th, the two arrived at the church on motorcycles, tried to enter but were blocked by guards and detonated the bomb. That day was the first day of Holy Week before Easter, when the church mass had just ended and at least 20 people were injured by the explosion.

Local media revealed that the male bomber had written to his family, expressing his intention to become a martyr and lay down his life for the faith. According to a neighbor, the male bomber was a street vendor selling food on the street, and his parents lived nearby. The neighbor told AFP: “He was a good boy when he was a kid… But as he gets older, he doesn’t have much social contact with the people here.”

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On the 29th, the Indonesian anti-terrorist forces searched multiple locations in Makassar, including the residences of the bomber and his wife. During a series of raids, the police seized 5.5 kilograms of explosives, as well as triacetone triperoxide (TATP), which is often used by Islamic armed groups, and several other materials for making bombs.

According to Reuters, police have arrested 13 people in Greater Jakarta, West Nusa Tenggara, and Makassar after the attack. Indonesia’s National Police Commissioner Listjo said: “They each played a different role, including buying raw materials, teaching how to make bombs, and making and using explosives.”

In a series of raids, Indonesian police seized 5.5 kilograms of explosives, as well as triacetone, which is often used by Islamic armed groups, to make bombs. 
(AFP)

The Indonesian government: will guarantee the right of every believer to fulfill his religious obligations

After the bombing incident, Indonesian President Joko Widodo issued a statement severely condemning the terrorist attack and ordered the chief of police of the country to thoroughly investigate the terrorist criminal network and dig out its root cause.

Joko said: “Terrorism is a crime against humanity. I call on everyone to fight against terrorism and radicalism that violate religious values.” Joko also said that Indonesia is a country that advocates multiple values, and the government will ensure that every believer fulfills it. The right to religious duties. The government will bear all medical and nursing expenses for the injured in this incident.

Indonesian Police Chief Listyyo stated that the Indonesian Special Anti-terrorist Special Unit 88 (Densus 88) broke the JAD network in Makassar in January this year and arrested about 20 people, including the assailants on the 28th.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Singapore strongly condemns the terrorist attack on Indonesian churches. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs issued a statement on the incident on the 29th, indicating that such acts of violence against innocent civilians and religious sites are totally unjustified.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo issued a statement severely condemning the terrorist attack and ordered the chief of police of the country to thoroughly investigate the terrorist criminal network and dig out its root cause. 
(Reuters)

The Indonesian government: will guarantee the right of every believer to fulfill his religious obligations

After the bombing incident, Indonesian President Joko Widodo issued a statement severely condemning the terrorist attack and ordered the chief of police of the country to thoroughly investigate the terrorist criminal network and dig out its root cause.

Joko said: “Terrorism is a crime against humanity. I call on everyone to fight against terrorism and radicalism that violate religious values.” Joko also said that Indonesia is a country that advocates multiple values, and the government will ensure that every believer fulfills it. The right to religious duties. The government will bear all medical and nursing expenses for the injured in this incident.

Indonesian Police Chief Listyyo stated that the Indonesian Special Anti-terrorist Special Unit 88 (Densus 88) broke the JAD network in Makassar in January this year and arrested about 20 people, including the assailants on the 28th.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Singapore strongly condemns the terrorist attack on Indonesian churches. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs issued a statement on the incident on the 29th, indicating that such acts of violence against innocent civilians and religious sites are totally unjustified.

Malaysia: The domestic situation is still under control, citizens need not worry

In response to the church attack in Indonesia, Assistant Director Norma Issa, Director of the Counter-Terrorism Unit of the Political Department of the Police Headquarters in Bukit Aman, Malaysia, pointed out that Malaysians, especially Christians, do not need to worry about terrorist attacks on Indonesian churches because the domestic situation is still Under control.

He said: “Our situation is under control, and the social structure and geographical situation of our country are very different from Indonesia. If they (terrorists) try to enter Peninsular Malaysia, they will be trapped here because there are not too many places. You can hide. Unlike Malaysia, the militants in Indonesia are very tightly organized. On the other hand, the organization here is loose and there is no leader.”

Expert: Islamic foreign spillover effects and harm are still strong

In recent years, many terrorist attacks in Indonesia and other countries have been claimed by the Islamic State organization. Most of the attackers were deeply influenced by the organization’s extreme ideology, showing that this “hundred-legged bug” still survived the defeats of Syria and Iraq. Large spillover effects and harmfulness.

Analysts believe that the members of the Islamic State organization that fled Iraq and Syria, whether returning to their homeland or fleeing to other countries, are likely to continue to actively implement the “Islamic State” dogma.

Secondly, the branches of the Islamic State organization in different countries and regions may continue to echo each other, using the name “Islamic State” to “keep together.” The influence of the “Islamic State” is still there, and it still has the value of continuing to use it for international terrorists.

Tao Kefi, a terrorist expert on the international peace-building agency, pointed out earlier that following the siege of the Iraqi organization in Syria and Iraq, the organization has encouraged its supporters to launch terrorist attacks in their respective countries. He pointed out that as early as a few years ago, the Organization of Iraq had a statute that if jihadists were unable to travel to Syria, the best course of action would be to launch individual attacks in their areas. This phenomenon is worrying.

The most recent major attack in Indonesia occurred in May 2018, when two families carried out a suicide bombing at a church in Surabaya, causing many deaths and injuries. 
(AFP)

Other terrorist attacks

The most recent major attack in Indonesia occurred in May 2018, when two families carried out a series of suicide bombings at churches in Surabaya, killing at least 15 people and injuring others, including two girls. The police said their father was the leader of a local branch of JAD.

In 2016, JAD launched a shooting and suicide bombing in the capital Jakarta, killing four civilians and four attackers. One of them was killed by a bomb detonated in a Starbucks coffee shop. This is the first time the Islamic State has admitted responsibility for the Southeast Asian attack.

The Jolo Cathedral in the southern province of Sulu, the southern Philippines, was also hit by an explosion in January 2019, causing 21 deaths and more than 100 injuries. The Indonesian police announced in June of that year that the attackers were a “theocracy” couple from Makassar.

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