April 20, 2021

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Marina Bay Sands ranked second in the world’s most beautiful buildings

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Marina Bay Sands is considered to be one of the buildings that best fits the golden ratio, and it is also the only Singapore building on the list among the world's 50 most beautiful buildings. (File photo)

Marina Bay Sands is considered to be one of the buildings that best fits the golden ratio, and it is also the only Singapore building on the list among the world's 50 most beautiful buildings.

Marina Bay Sands was voted the second most beautiful building in the world in a battle of the “golden ratio”.

Roofing Megastore, a British roofing material supply company, announced the results of a fun selection activity, using the golden ratio to select the world’s 50 most beautiful buildings.

The top five buildings are St Paul’s Cathedral in the United Kingdom, Marina Bay Sands Hotel in Singapore, Westminster Abbey in the United Kingdom (Westminster Abbey, also translated as Westminster Abbey), Osaka City in Japan, and the Saint Paul’s Cathedral in Russia. Basil’s Cathedral (St. Basil’s Cathedral).

In terms of countries, the United States has six landmark buildings on the list, which is the country with the most seats. The selected ones include the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building in New York, followed by Germany, with five buildings on the list.

This selection activity studied the golden ratio of 100 well-known buildings around the world to determine which buildings are the most eye-catching visually. The researcher first draws the nine basic points of a building, such as the upper left corner, upper right corner and the middle point of the building, and then measures whether the points meet the golden ratio.

St. Paul’s Cathedral, voted the most beautiful building, was built in 1710. The results calculated by the researcher show that 72.28% of its data is in line with the golden ratio, and the second place Marina Bay Sands is 70.88%.

Roofing Megastore’s statement issued today pointed out that only a quarter of the top 50 buildings were built after the 19th century. The proportions of some contemporary buildings are extremely low in compliance with the golden ratio, showing that the classic Goethe and Romanesque architecture still fits best The golden ratio.

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